Past taxes

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Bshelton08
Bshelton08 Member Newcomer

I have been filing single on my taxes but it is just me an my daughter in the home I believe I been filing wrong how will know if I am and is there of my money available from filing wrong

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  • Henry
    Henry FreeTaxUSA Agent
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    Hi Bshelton08, in general, if you aren't married and your daughter lived with you for more than half of the year, you can claim the Head of Household filing status. The Head of Household filing status will usually give you a larger refund than using the Single filing status because the Head of Household filing status gets a higher standard deduction and lower tax rates than the Single filing status.

    If you want to be sure that you meet the qualifications to use the Head of Household filing status, the IRS has a great interactive tool you can use. It is available here: https://www.irs.gov/help/ita/what-is-my-filing-status

    Once you have determined the right filing status to use for your situation, you can proceed with filing your tax return. If you find that you used the wrong filing status on past tax returns, then you can amend those returns to change your filing status. The IRS generally allows you up to three years from the original filing deadline to file an amendment and claim a refund.

    To amend a prior-year return, use the Prior Year Products page by clicking on the Prior Years menu from our home page or from within your account. Sign into your prior year account and click on the website logo at the top of your screen and select "File an amended tax return." Or select the option, "Amend Tax Return" from the Account menu on the right.

    Once you select the option to amend your return, read the amendment instructions carefully then continue to change your return.

    Please note that most prior year amended returns cannot be e-filed, they must be mailed. When you feel your amended return is ready, select the Final Steps menu option and follow the screens to file your amended return with the IRS and/or your state.